Islandhopping 101: Best Guide In and Out of Roxas City


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La Playa de Roxas, People’s Park Brgy. Baybay Roxas City

“I really love this city, It is beautiful and It’s so multidimensional. People say it has a darkness and a decadence, which it tries to hide; they say it’s full of the pretentious and opulent trying to strangle the dark reality. But that’s true for most of the other great cities too. . . .
There is a soul here . . . and that soul is as pure as the heat of the sun that shines down on it and the rain that falls to purify it.”

Umair Naeem, Drowning Shadows

The first time I set my foot here,  first thing comes on my mind is the scent of its air, like a perfume that goes inside my head and send me to a euphoria that brought me back to my good memories of the beautiful Obando in Bulacan. The familiar scent of a fishpond, rivers and muddy sea; it smells fish, crab and oysters- and most of all it smells MONEY. However,  Roxas City is much better version. The city, dubbed as the”Seafoods Capital of the Philippines” looks classy and yet simple on my first impression, and so does my second. It has a well maintained city street  with flourishing businesses on each and every corner, at the other side of the river is the century old structure and a museum which I believe a welcome treat for every first timer here; their “Baybay” or beach front – facing the Sibuyan Sea, known to be a rich fishing ground – it has plenty of reasons to fell in love with, for one is their restaurants (along Baybay) which offers variety of mouth watering seafood; two, is the many places to explore and get a change to grab some photos- almost filling the entire 8Gb of memory of my dslr camera. Pueblo de Panay on the other hand, is quite unique to my eyes because of the vast landscape of greenery with establishments (worthy of a visit) sprouting all over the rolling hills- it made me wish to stay for few more days and maybe, just maybe I might be coming here every now and then. And finally,  the most promising tourist attraction is the majestic shrine of Sacred Heart of Jesus standing over the hilltop comparable to that of the Christ the Redeemer of Brazil which can be seen far off-shore. How about that for Roxas City!

I have been here twice before, the last one was just three weeks ago- exactly five days after New Year’s celebration. Coming here together with a friend was a welcome treat for us. As planned months earlier, we embarked on a 36 hours long Island hopping adventure coming from Dumaguete on our way to Batangas/Manila. Actually, traveling here  was like a mere familiarization to the once Off-the-beaten-path, but for my companion being his first time it was an adventure of a lifetime. Our trip here (as my traveling companion have said “rather unusual because we were traveling on foot at the not so quite familiar road heading to our destination”) was rather not easy as we took every transportation available- slow boat, bus, jeep and tricycle ride; our trip took us on a route from Dumaguete heading to Bacolod City then on Dumangas-Zarraga up to the City of Roxas. And after few hours of strolling and gazing on a landscape of the city within late afternoon we were sailing on a calm sea towards the island of Romblon, Romblon, and then further more to Port of Batangas before heading to Manila. After a two days of rest, I myself, on my homeward bound took the same road again, the Manila to Batangas (2 hours bus) then took a 19 hours boat trip for Roxas City, then another two hours bus ride to Iloilo City before heading to Bacolod via fast craft,  and culminating my trip is a six hour drive down south to Dumaguete City, indeed a  back-breaking and mind boggling travel. So eager to know how to do it? Well, follow this easy tips:

Coming from the Backdoor

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Going to Bacolod via Dumaguete is not really a big problem as big buses of Ceres Tours plies on this route every now and then,  it goes directly to Mabinay then to the City of Kabankalan before heading to the City of Smiles- after several more stop. The trip  last for six hours and cost 270 Pesos for ordinary buses and 359 Pesos for air-con buses.

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If you’re coming from Cebu City just head to Port of Toledo in Toledo City,  from there board a fast craft for San Carlos City in Negros Occidental. Once arrive you have to take a short tricycle ride to the bus terminal going for Bacolod City.

Click on the link to see ferry schedule: Toledo to San Carlos ferry 

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Once in Bacolod City take a public transport vehicle to BREDCO Port and then hop on-board on one of these RO-RO vessel forDumangas Port. Fare charges for each person cost less than a hundred pesos, travel time usually last about two hours.

Click on the link to view Ferry schedule:  Bacolod-Dumangas vv.  RORO Guide (2016 update) 

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Note: You may also board a Fast craft such as this heading to Iloilo City or vice versa. The lowest fare for this fast craft per person usually at 200 Pesos plus terminal fee of 30 Pesos, and travel time last about an hour or more.

Dumangas Port

Upon arrival in Dumangas Port you only need to take a little walk heading to the exit, a barker will approached every passenger and points to the numerous tricycles queuing one after another awaiting for passengers, I took one of these public transport to reach the town of Dumangas. Travel time usually last for about 10-15 minutes and cost about 15 Pesos per head.

Side note: Photo above shows the Fast craft terminal in Iloilo City. Just in case you opted this destination upon arrival to this Port you need to board a Jeep heading to SM Delgado and then from there another Jeep going to Tagbak Terminal. Bus terminal (the newly constructed building along the highway) going to the northern destination such Caticlan or Roxas City is located in Tagbak, Jaro.  Cost for the two Jeepney ride would be at least 30 Pesos per person. If you’re not in the mood for a Jeepney ride then you may opt for a Taxi ride, flag down rates cost about 40 Pesos and if you’re lucky your fare would reach to about 100 Pesos less.

To view latest ferry schedule, please click your mouse on the link: Roro & Ferry Schedules

On the other side of the town away from Iloilo City is the sleepy town of Dumangas – 24 kilometers away from the capital- about a hundred meters away from its town hall is the public transport terminal for passenger Jeepney’s and Vans which usually all in queues to take  passengers. Their service usually last from sun up to sun down. Jeepney route usually goes to Iloilo City via Zarraga and vice versa, whereas Van for hire take the Coastal Road in route to Iloilo City (Baldoza Terminal, La Paz).

Side Note: Back in Iloilo City the biggest bus lines in Panay Island (perhaps in the whole country) that often preferred by almost every tourist and local passengers because of their reliability, convenience and availability even at night. Buses often leaves every hour (from sun-up to sun-down) to Roxas City and vice versa. Travel time takes about three hours (traffic and road repair works means it may take more than that), cost per person depending on bus line or van for hire but usually it never goes beyond 200 Pesos.

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Again if your coming from Dumangas there is no need for you to go to Iloilo City to have a decent bus ride to Caticlan or Roxas City, just ask the Jeepney driver to drop  you at the town of Zarraga (at the National Highway), and from there a handful of bus lines goes to and from Caticlan or Roxas City. Length of travel  usually last for two hours and fare cost per person is about 170 or a little less.

See the video showing the Highway:   Zarraga Iloilo

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The Immaculate Concepcion Cathedral located in the old Pueblo de Capiz (Capitol area), from here it only takes a tricycle ride from a much better public transportation hub in Roxas City ( Buses normally stops here and it will never venture near the city street- I wish Dumaguete can emulate their willingness to make their city organized to lessen the problem on traffic) located in Pueblo de Panay.

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Remember: Traveling here is pretty easy just follow the few road tips above and you’ll be in Roxas City in no time.

From Manila 

Unfortunately there are no passenger ship that connects this two cities, one must travel on a bus (plying LRT-Buendia to Batangas Port) for at least two hours via SLEX. Almost every bus companies serving this route offers air-conditioned with entertainment on-board of course, and fare cost is somewhere between 150- 200 Pesos.

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2GO Travel’s M/V St. Anthony de Padua sails from Batangas to Roxas City via Romblon, Romblon every Tuesday and Friday at 10 PM. Sea travel usually last to 15 hours and fare cost start at 1,100 Pesos for economy accommodation. Trying it myself last three weeks ago, I think the experience I have on-board was over-all pleasant although the food served to economy passenger wasn’t that good at all. I know first class accommodation was way better, but sorry to say I am no fan of first class accommodation and so does majority of sea-going public.

The cheapest fare around at 950 Pesos (Air-conditioned room) per person is via Super Shuttle RoRo 2 which plies three times a week from Batangas and every Monday, Wednesday, Friday at 3 PM coming from Culasi Port. It is highly recommended if your bringing along with you your SUV, pick-up and/or sedan going to Caticlan or down south Iloilo. They do have cheaper charges on each vehicles as compared to the rival. But honestly I won’t recommend it to any tourist as facilities were not acceptable by decent standard such as toilet facilities, I’m disappointed really about such neglect, it was simple necessities that should have been looked at carefully.  Decent dining table coupled with fresh cook foods (if any) must be accorded to paying passengers, if possible. I’m fed up with on-board canteen whose expertise is to serve instant noodle. I think the management should address this simple passenger necessities to  garner better feedback and perhaps win more patron- just my humble opinion.

Click on the link to see ferry schedule:  Batangas RoRo/Ferry schedule 

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Caticlan Jetty Port in Malay – a transportation hub for RORO vessels coming from Port of Roxas in Mindoro Oriental, Odiongan Port in Tablas Island as well as Port of Batangas-  a  jump off to the island of Boracay Island is another alternative point of entry, although the drawback is that of the punishing land trip that is quite stressful. From here it takes only 2 to 3 hours scenic drive to Roxas City via Capiz-Aklan road network, Van for-hire as well as Ceres Tours have a daily trip here; Fares  between Roxas City to Caticlan  cost around 200 Pesos more or less per head.

Click on the link to see ferry schedule:  Caticlan-Mindoro ferry

 Images along  City of Roxas

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That seemingly arms length away island known as Mantalinga, as viewed on my camera. This miniature like island was known as  perfect diving spot for scuba practitioners and a perfect roundabout for sailboat (dilayag) and kayak during contest.

The old Passenger Terminal Building of Culasi Port

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The statue of St. Michael the Archangel, it can be seen on one of the Rotonda in Pueblo de Panay estate.

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The statue of Sacred Heart of Jesus standing tall on the hills over-looking Roxas City, Sibuyan Sea and Jintotolo Channel. This statue is said to have dwarfed the statue of the Christ the Redeemer in Brazil.

Featured Philippine Ports: Batangas Port


Batangas Port

copyright: mcgutib

BATANGAS

Better known as the “Industrial Port City”,  Batangas is one of the fastest growing economy in CALABARZON province-an export driven industrial development region that stimulated the growth of shipping activities in Batangas Port. Bordered by the Province of Cavite and Laguna to the north; Quezon Province to the east, crossing Verde Island Passage to the south is Mindoro, and to the west is the West Philippine Sea. It’s capital is Batangas City.

Long before the arrival of the Spaniards in the country, large communities are already settled along the Pansipit River- a navigable channel (it used to be- that is before Taal volcano’s eruption in 18th century) connecting Taal Lake to Balayan Bay. These community have been engaging trades with Japanese during Muromachi period, and Chinese traders since the Ming Dynasty in the 13th and 15th century.

The first Spanish missionaries arrived in 1572, later on in 1581 a settlement was established and named it “Batangan”  because of the numerous big logs that were seen at Calumpang river. The logs by the way were named “batang” by people settled near the river, and later on the word batang were replaced and it became Batangas in 1601.

On 21st of June 1969, the late President Ferdinand Marcos signed a law (Republic Act No. 5495) creating Batangas a City. On 23rd of July 1969, Batangas City government was formally established.

Batangas City is approximately 112 kilometers southwest of Manila. Batangas Port (declared as a national port in 1956) on the other hand, is located in Barangay Sta. Clara, about two kilometers from the city proper; and situated in the northeastern part of Batangas bay, a strategic site for the development of port facilities. The bay area has a 180 square kilometers of body of sea while the mouth of the bay is approximately 16 kilometers across, and is well-protected by Mindoro, Maricaban Island, and Calumpan Peninsula. Batangas Bay has a steep underwater slope, thus for the most part the bay is calm and deep perfect for large ocean going vessel to anchor near the shoreline.

PORT OF ENTRY:  Port of Batangas

This ISO 9001:2008 certified port was first constructed in the middle of 1930’s, its facilities were utilized as the entry/exit for people and products going to and from the Province of Mindoro, Marinduque, Romblon, and Palawan (MIMAROPA). More importantly, Port of Batangas served as the strategic shipping venue for all industries in the areas of Cavite, Laguna, Batangas, Rizal, and Quezon (CALABARZON-as it was popularly known).

The port facilitates the transport link by land and sea routes using inter-modal buses, ro-ro/lo-lo vessels, motorized out-rigger boats, and mono-hauled/trimaran fastcraft (introduced in 1995) within the Ports of Calapan, Puerto Galera, and Abra de Ilog in Oriental Mindoro. It also links the west coast ports of San Jose and Sablayan in Occidental Mindoro, Ports in Sta. Cruz and Balanacan in the province of Mariduque, Port of Romblon and Odiongan; so does the Port of Coron in Busuanga Island, and major Ports in Cebu, Iloilo, and Cagayan de Oro as well.

Batangas Port form part of Port Authority’s Strong Republic’s Nautical Highway (SRNH) project bridging the island of Luzon, Visayas, and Mindanao in an extensive network of highways and ro-ro inter-connectivity. Western Nautical Highway is composed of RORO Ports linking between:

– Batangas City and Calapan City, Oriental Mindoro;

Roxas, Oriental Mindoro and Caticlan, Aklan;

Dumangas Port, Iloilo  and BREDCO Port, Bacolod City ;

Dumaguete City, Negros Oriental and Dapitan City, Zamboanga del Norte.

Batangas Port ferry schedules and fare, click here: RORO/FERRY 2015 Schedule

How to get here?

Ceres Bus at Batangas Port

Ceres Bus at Batangas Port

Port of Batangas is strategically located on the northeastern section of Batangas Bay along the southwestern part of Luzon. The port is about three to four hours away from Manila’s business and commercial district via South Luzon Expressway (SLEX) which then connects to Southern Tagalog Arterial Road (Star Tollway), and its extension  Alabang -Calamba-Sto. Tomas Toll Expressway (ACTEX).  Bus lines like the RRCG, Ceres Transport, Alps Express, JAM Trans, Supreme Transit Liner Inc., DLTB Co., N. de la Rosa Transit, and Batangas Star Express are amongst competing on this route. You may be familiar with their dashboard signage:

  1. Buendia/Taft-Batangas Pier
  2. Cubao-Batangas Pier
  3. Taft/Pasay-Batangas Pier
  4. Lawton-Batangas Pier
  5. Ortigas-Batangas Pier
  6. Alabang-Batangas Pier

Pre -Development Stage

Batangas Port started its roll on-roll off operation to Mindoro Province in 1981. And by 1994, the volume of  sea-going passengers heading to Calapan, Puerto Galera, and Abra de ilog steadily increased due to influx of vacationers and local tourist during holidays and weekends to take advantage of beautiful sand beach, and breathtaking sceneries that offer leisure and relaxation. Passenger traffic among  various shipping liner with connections to Mindoro’s west coast ports of San Jose and Sablayan, Romblon’s Odiongan and Tablas Port, so does Coron Port in Busuanga Island, have all been picking up its pace in succeeding years thus competing to giant inter-island shipping companies which offers  Manila direct route.

Due to the congestion and over-capacity of Port of Manila in the early years, government agency planners seek alternative ports to address these issues. A major opportunity for development of Batangas Port were then foreseen because of the fact that it sits on a strategic location-which is near proximity to the thriving economic zone of CALABARZON region, the Agri-Marine products of  MIMAROPA, and the growing economies of the provinces in Vis-Min region. It has been established that vessels sailing from major ports of origin around the Visayas and Mindanao area, would likely save fuel and time if it chooses  Batangas Port rather than the usual North or South Harbor as their port of destination, the reason behind it is because sailing to North harbor for example add six hours more; sailing in both the northward and southward direction will cost more fuel and precious time (approximately 12 hours turn around).

Batangas Port then was once considered one of the two most underdeveloped ports in the country (the other is port of Cebu), and  already struggling to accommodate rolling cargo traffic and large number of domestic vessels. Existing port facilities then are “cramped and dilapidated making orderly and efficient operation impossible” (5). The Port itself cannot meet the necessities needed for tourist/passenger’s convenience especially during peak season, thus contributed to the inefficiency in shipping services.

The Port neither had any berth specifically built for ro-ro vessel, thus limiting ferry operators to three companies. It was customary then for a ferry vessel to remain at berth even past their scheduled departure time just waiting to fill all the vacant spaces with vehicles and passengers, forcing the next vessel in-line to wait for more hours for their turn.

In 1981, a preliminary study were made by Philippine Ports Authority (PPA), instituting a plan to relieved Manila’s premier ports of portions of the international and domestic liner shipping trade. A major development project was formed together with the National Economic and Development Authority (NEDA), and is considered to be one of the anchor projects for the Cavite-Laguna-Batangas-Rizal-Quezon regional development program. It aimed to:

i). Improved the function as the access point to Mindoro Island: To promote the supplies and distribution of agricultural products from Mindoro to Southern Tagalog Region, thereby contributing to the development of Mindoro Island.

ii). Function as a hub port contributing to the economic development of its hinterlands: To stimulate the regional economic development of the Southern Tagalog Region, the industrial heartland of the Philippines.

(iii). Functions relating to the National Capital Region: As a second port to supplement Manila Port’s North and South harbor where traffic congestion is worsening.

In 1984, the Batangas Port Expansion Program were formulated by the Philippine Government and Japanese International Cooperation Agency (JICA).

On December of 1985, a feasibility study were conducted for the Development Project of Batangas Port (known as Batangas Port Study). It was initiated by Japan International Cooperation Agency (JICA), upon the request from Philippine government and it became the basis for a loan from Japan’s Overseas Economic Cooperation Fund (OECF)  for the construction of Phases 1 and Phase 2 project. Within the feasibility study, the development plans were divided between short-term and long-term elements.

Executive Order No. 385, issued by then former President Corazon Aquino on the 19th of December 1989 delineated the territorial jurisdiction of the Port of Batangas, an important moved to increased its land use for future expansion. But it also raises future tensions, problems, issues, resulting to court battles between affected land owners/settlers on the affected community, and government implementing agencies. Issues such as land ownership, forced-eviction, compensation, re-settlement, so on and so forth.

Department of Transportation and Communication likewise were given a task to prepare a National Port Transport Plan to address regional development needs, and comply with the privatization program integrating an inter-modal transport network that would link road, rail, sea, and air transport systems efficiently. Executive Order Nos. 212, paves the way for the deregulation of all government ports in the country.

Batangas Port Development Project (BPDP) of the Philippine Ports Authority was one of the major flagship programs of Philippines 2000, the development plan of then President Fidel Ramos Administration in its bid for a globally competitive economy.

Facilities of Batangas Port before the implementation BPDP

Facilities Size

Size

Use

Status

Construction Date

Pier I Length 135mtrs.Width 15mtrs.Water Depth 6mtrs. Shared between Ro-Ro and general cargo vessel

Under repair

(from typhoon damage)

1940’s

Pier II Length 48mtrs.Width 12mtrs.Depth 4mtrs.

Shared between Ro-Ro and general cargo vessel

Extremely dilapidated

1971

Pier III Length 85mtrs.Width 15mtrs.Depth 2.67mtrs.

Inner side for ship repair, outer side for barge mooring

Extremely dilapidated

1971

Parallel wharves  Length 93mtr.Width 15mtrs.Depth 7.5mtrs.

General cargo vessels (domestic and foreign)

Wharf entrance

congested with cargo vehicles

1972

Land for Portfacilities

2.6 ha

Offices, customs house, passenger terminal, parking space

Cramped and crowded with vehicles,passengers and cargo.

N.A

Vessels serving Batangas Port  in 1994 (MARINA franchised)

OPERATOR/NAME OF VESSEL

TYPE OF VESSEL

ROUTE

AC SHIPPING LINES. CO.

 

M/VPRINCESS AC – IV

PAX-FERRY

PGalera -BTGS-PGalera

MB QUEEN AC -II

PAX-FERRY

PGalera -BTGS-TGLY-BTGS – PGalera

MB PRINCESS AC-VI

PAX-FERRY

PGAL -PISA-TGLY-BTGS- TGLY-PISA-PGAL

 

BERNARDO ATIENZA

 

MB AC-1

PAX-FERRY

PGAL-BTGS-PGAL

 

MONTENEGRO SHIPPING LINES

 

MB DON VICENTE

PAX-FERRY

BTGS-ABRA DE ILOG-BTGS

MB DONA MATILDE

PAX-FERRY

BTGS- ABRA DE ILOG -BTGS

MB DON FRANCISCO

PAX-FERRY

BTGS- ABRA DE ILOG -BTGS

 

SI-KAT FERRIES INC.

 

MB SI-KAT II

PAX-FERRY

PGALERA-BTGS-PGALERA

 

VIVA SHIPPING LINES

 

M/V VIVA PENAFRANCIA II

PAX-FERRY

BTGS-BUAN-GSAN-ODIO-LOOC-SAGU-ROMBON-SAGU-LOOC-ODIO-GSAN-BUAN-BTGS

M/V LADY OF LOURDES

PAX-FERRY

BTGS-CLPN-BTGS

M/V VIVA PENAFRANCIA IV

PAX-FERRY

BTGS-CLPN-BTGS

M/V VIVA PENAFRANCIA VI

PAX-FERRY

BTGS-CLPN-BTGS

M/V VIVA PENAFRANCIA IX

PAX-FERRY

BTGS-CLPN-BTGS

M/V VIVA STA ANA

PAX-FERRY

BTGS–SANJOSE-BTGS

Post-Development Stage

Batangas Domestic Cargo Berth

Batangas Domestic Cargo Berth

Phase 1 Project

Domestic area project correspond to the short term portion of Batangas Port Development Plan’s overall plan, and aimed on improving, and expanding the cramped and inadequate facilities of the Port- so that movement of passengers, vehicles, cargoes, and roll-0n-and roll-off vessels become more efficient. It was constructed at a cost of P1.60 billion under the 17th Overseas Economic Cooperation Fund (OECF). Completed on march of 1999, three years and seven months behind scheduled completion date of august of 1995. Their new and modern facility includes:

A total berthing capacity of 16 berths with controlling water depth of between 5 to 10 meters, ready to serve at at any given time;

It has a modest capacity to accommodate 11 RORO vessels (six roll-on/roll-off ramp at 680 meters in total length);

It has seven berths for high speed ferries of 540 meters in total length;

and two berthing facilities for cargo vessels of 200 meters in length.

Three fully Air-conditioned Passenger Terminal Buildings (PTB’s) capable of handling three million embarking passengers annually.

A range of modern cargo handling equipment including quay cranes and forklifts are available. A computerized cargo tracking system is also being used.

Storage warehouses, reefer vans, maintenance shop, power and pump houses;

A 25,000 sq. meters of marshalling yard;

It has a total land area of 206,349 square meters.

Batangas VTMS Radar Station 2

Batangas VTMS Radar Station 2

For passenger safety, vessel security, and traffic monitoring along the harbor, baseport Batangas installed a total port security system; this includes vessel traffic management system or VTMS (manned by coast guard personnel). Crowd monitoring system, Gate management system, Mobile x-ray scanning machine, and Harbor patrol craft.

Changes in fastcraft  operation between Batangas and Calapan

 

1997

(Before completion of the project)

1998

 (After completion of the project)

Number of specialized berths

0

7

Number of ferry operators

2

3

Round trips for ferry/day

3-6

4-7

Number of vessels

7

7

Crossing time (Batangas ~ Calapan)

45 mins.

45 mins.

Number of departures per day

32

35

First and last departures from Batangas

5:00 am/6:30 pm

4:45 am/6:30 pm

Changes in Ro-Ro vessel operation between Batangas  and Calapan

 

1997

 (Before completion of the project)

1998

 (After completion of the project)

Number of specialized berths

0

6

Number of ferry operators

3

8

Round trips for ferry/day

2

3

Number of vessels

10

18

Average vessel GT

480GT

590GT

Crossing time (Batangas ~ Calapan)

2-3 H

2-3H

Number of departures per day from

24

52

First and last departures from Batangas Port

1 am-9 pm

12:30 am/11:30 pm

Phase II Project

Batangas Port Development Plan Phase II project represent the long-term plan for Batangas Port. Costing three billion pesos,  it sits on 128 hectare expanded area specifically built for large-scale cargo handling, with capacity to handle foreign/domestic cargoes at 4.34 million tons per year (in 2005); to which it could promote its functions as a supplementary port for Manila. It was planned to serve not only the Visayas-Mindanao region, but design to meet the demands of growing trade, and commerce between the countries in the ASEAN region. The Phase II loan agreement was signed on March 1997; assisted by five and a half billion pesos loan grant from Japan Bank of International Cooperation (JBIC). It was inaugurated on January 19, 2008, two months ahead of the scheduled completion.

Phase II Project is subdivided into Packages 1, 2 and 3 namely:

Package 1 are civil and marine works; it includes container terminal and handling equipment instillation (estimated cost of P1.06 billion), general cargo berth, dredging, and reclamation works, building construction and support facilities.

Boarding bridge

One of five boarding bridges installed in Batangas Port.

 Package 2 on the other hand, are construction of five boarding bridges and elevated walkways were completed.

 Package 3, better known as Arterial Road Links Development Project is a port access and flyover construction. These includes the P1.5-billion Southern Tagalog Arterial Road (STAR) projects, and the South Luzon Expressway (SLEX) road widening and expansion project.

Batangas Port Management

Philippine Ports Authority (PPA) is a government-owned corporation attached to the Department of Transportation and Communication (DOTC). It was created by virtue of Presidential Decree (PD) No. 505 dated 11 July 1974, its functions are to coordinate, streamline, improve and optimize the planning, development, financing, construction, maintenance and operations of ports or port system in the country.

The Port District of South Luzon (PDO-SOLUZ) is one of the five (5) port district offices created in 1988, to promote the de-centralization of authority and pursue local and regional development programs and strategies. The District Office supervises the Port Management Offices (PMO) and likewise serves as their linkage with the Philippine Ports Authority’s head office. PDO Southern Luzon has four (4) management offices in its wing, namely;

  1. PMO Batangas (Baseport)
  2. PMO Calapan
  3. PMO Legazpi
  4. PMO Puerto Princesa

On the other hand, Baseport Batangas has the jurisdiction of the six (6) Terminal offices, namely;

  1. TMO BAUAN   Brgy. Aplaya Bauan, Batangas,
  2. TMO LUCENA  Brgy. Talao-Talao, Lucena City
  3. TMO BALANACAN  San Andres Point, Balanacan Marinduque
  4. TMO STA CRUZ  Marinduque
  5. TMO ODIONGAN  Brgy. Batiano, Odiongan Romblon
  6. TMO ROMBLON  Municipality of Romblon,  Romblon Island

Batangas Port is exclusively operated by Aries Arrastre Services Inc. (subsidiary of Asian Terminals Inc.) with the charges set by PPA,  and a prescribed portion of the profits are paid to the PMO Batangas.

Batangas Port Characteristics

LATITUDE: 13° 45.2′ N
LONGITUDE: 121° 06.6″ E

Navigational Approach From the south, between Motoco Point and Malajibo manok  Islands with an opening of 3 ½ miles, white flashing beacon on Malajibomanok Island Center, duration 0.3 seconds every 10 seconds visible within 8 miles in clear weather. Islands and point can be approached within ½ miles.

Anchorage: The anchorage area is 0.37 km. from shoreline, southwest of the piers with depth of 27.4 to 32.9 meters mud bottom. During southwest monsoon, vessels may anchor off Mabini, Batangas. Good holding grounds off 0.46 km. from the shoreline, with depths of 21.9 to 25.6m. Foreign vessels find good anchorage area southwest of the piers.

Sea Distance:

Batangas to Calapan- approximately 25.65 nautical miles

Batangas to Puerto Galera- approximately 15.47 nautical miles

Batangas to Manila- approximately 92.23 nautical miles (via North of Maricaban Island)

Batangas to Cebu- approximately 303 nautical miles.


 REFERENCES:

1. Batangas Port Development Project

2. http://bulatlat.com/main/2007/02/10/12-years-of-privatization-of-the-port-of-batangas/

3. batangascity.gov.ph
4. Nathan Associates Inc. 1994. Liner Shipping Route Study, Final Report, vols. 1 and 14. Manila: United States Agency for International Development.

5. Dr. Emma Porio, Demolition and Resettlement of Sta. Clara Residents: Policy, Politics, and Personalities in the Batangas Port Development Project. Japan Bank for International Cooperation (JBIC)

6. Myrna S. Austria, 2003. Liberalization and Deregulation in the Domestic Shipping Industry: Effects on Competition and Market Structure.

7. philippines.wikia.com/wiki/Batangas

8. Introduction & summary of Batangas Port presentation by JICA-JCCIPI

9. pdosoluz.com.ph